Aterpe Programme | Official Athletic Club Website

Aterpe Programme

Athletic Club’s Child Protection Policy

INTRODUCTION
The protection and creation of safe spaces for children in the field of sports is a challenge that sports institutions need to tackle.
Although this issue has always been a basic part of its daily work, Athletic Club has taken a step forward in terms of child protection inside its own institution with the creation of the ATERPE (‘refuge’ in Basque) project. It is a policy that unites all the work done by the club in this field and it is known and respected by all its workers.
In addition, the club’s Child Protection Officer is laying the foundations for systematic work that will culminate in a comprehensive child protection policy, including elements of prevention, training and specific procedures, the sole purpose of which is the well-being of all the children within the organisation.
This role is ground breaking within football and sports on a national level. No other club in LaLiga and very few internationally have one. It is a clear message of institutional responsibility towards the children we work with in all of the organisation’s projects. Not only for the children in the academy football teams, but also in the Foundation, External Project and partner clubs. This innovative measure could lead the way towards comprehensive child protection in the world of sport.

Vision
All the children in our junior categories and those who take part in any activity organised by our institution must have a safe/protected space for doing sports. This means there should be adults present who are aware, trained and responsible for the well-being of the athlete.

Commitment
For Athletic Club, the well-being of all the children in its junior categories is a key priority.

Our commitment to this issue is clear and is reflected in the creation of the ATERPE child protection policy.
Therefore, the responsibility for creating safe spaces rests with everyone at the club. The ATERPE child protection policy “obliges, must be known by and be respected” by everyone at the club: the Board of Directors, employees, volunteers, trainees, etc.
BASIC PRINCIPLES:
The basic principles take the legislation and recommendations of various international working groups on child protection in sport into account:
  • EU Work Plan for Sport 2014-17.
  • The International Charter of Physical Education, Physical Activity and Sports of UNESCO (1978), the last review of which is dated November 2015
  • The International Olympic Committee, Executive Commission, Consensus Statement on Sexual Harassment and Abuse dated February 2007.
  • Recommendations for the protection of young athletes and safeguarding children’s rights in sport from the Groups on Good Governance of the European Commission July 2016.
  • The International Olympic Committee’s Consensus Statement on: harassment and abuse (non-accidental violence) in sport.
  • Guidelines for International Federations and National Olympic Committees in terms of the creation and implementation of policies to protect athletes from abuse and harm in sport.
  • International Safeguards for Children in Sport from the International Group of Children in Sport. Beyond Sport Summit 2014.

The core principles

  • Respect for children’s rights. All children have the right to be protected from discrimination on the basis of gender, race, sexual orientation or religious belief.
  • The best interests of the child and their well-being are the core principles.
  • Commitment to prevention.
  • Continuous training.
  • Respect for the law and the requirement to comply with it (requirement of a certificate proving no prior sexual offences have been committed).
  • Culture of respect. Club staff must respect minimum standards and a code of conduct that includes respect for children’s rights.
  • Adequate communication: Establishment of adequate channels so that relevant figures inside the institution are made aware of situations of maltreatment or vulnerability.
  • Institutional commitment: existence of a Child Protection Officer at the Club as part of the Comprehensive Care Department.
  • Appropriate response in the event of a situation of vulnerability. Any possible suspicion or evidence of a situation of maltreatment will be taken seriously and responded to appropriately.
  • Encouraging participation.
OBJECTIVES
  • To analyse all the areas in the club where there is any kind of direct or indirect relationship with minors.
  • To have specific risk prevention procedures available for the areas analysed above.
  • A specific training plan for all professionals in the different areas of the club.
  • To have specific systems and procedures available for certain situations of vulnerability or maltreatment.
  • To support partner clubs and other organisations in our environment in the process of creating specific systems and procedures to prevent violence against children in sport.
  • To emphasise the importance of working on this issue in the field of sport.
The ATERPE programme is absolutely fundamental and is designed to safeguard the welfare of children in all cases, such as: protection against any situation involving physical, sexual, emotional harm and/or harassment.
The process of putting all the policy’s elements together is in progress now, and will culminate in a structure featuring at least the following:

INTERNALLY:

  • ADAPTED CODE OF CONDUCT
  • SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES FOR STAFF.
  • SECTOR-SPECIFIC TRAINING.
  • APPLYING SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES FOR SPECIFIC CASES OF MALTREATMENT.
  • OPERATIONAL COMMUNICATION CHANNEL.
  • AUTHORISATION AND INFORMED CONSENT RECEIVED AND STORED.

EXTERNALLY

  • SUPPORT TO PARTNER CLUBS IN THE FORMATION AND CREATION OF A PROTECTION POLICY.
  • COMMUNICATION AND CONSULTATION CHANNEL FOR QUERIES OR SPECIFIC CASES.
  • SHARED RESOURCE CENTRES. TEMPLATES FOR CLUBS OR INSTITUTIONS.
  • COLLABORATION WITH PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OR ORGANISATIONS TO PROMOTE CHILD PROTECTION IN SPORT.
  • CREATION OF OR PARTICIPATION IN FORUMS AND CONFERENCES ON THE SUBJECT.
ACTIONS UNDERTAKEN

From April to October: analysis of all the areas of the Club where work is being done directly and indirectly with minors.

In June:

  • Training requirement for 100% of the Athletic Club Campus monitors.
  • Training carried out for 100% of the monitors.
  • Specific training for co-ordinators.
  • Designation of the person in charge of protection at the Campus.
  • Establishment of a communication channel between the person in charge of protection at the Campus and the person in charge of protection at the Club.
  • Log of all queries and incidents that have occurred.
  • Preparation of a protection plan for outings with children.
  • In June, analysis of the trips to national and international tournaments by teams from our junior categories.
  • In September, preparation of a proposal for a protocol + checklist for tournaments with overnight stays.
  • In September, initial basic training on child protection for the coaches of the football teams based at Lezama.
  • In September, preparation of the tailoring and renewal of the document authorising the use of images and management of data relating to the children in our junior categories.
  • Extension of the requirement for 100% of the club’s workers to provide a certificate proving they have committed no sexual offences.